Nail stylist Weightlifting

California hair and nail salons can reopen — again — if they take it outdoors – North Bay Business Journal

Summary

Hair salons in so-called “watch list” counties — including all North Bay counties but Mendocino and Lake — shuttered by Gov. Gavin Newsom earlier this month after a spike in coronavirus cases.

On Monday, the owners learned they might be able to reopen – move operations out onto parking lots, sidewalks or other open-air areas next to their shops.

Earlier this month the governor ordered counties on the watch list for rising corona virus cases and other factors …….

Hair salons in so-called “watch list” counties — including all North Bay counties but Mendocino and Lake — shuttered by Gov. Gavin Newsom earlier this month after a spike in coronavirus cases.

On Monday, the owners learned they might be able to reopen – move operations out onto parking lots, sidewalks or other open-air areas next to their shops.

Earlier this month the governor ordered counties on the watch list for rising corona virus cases and other factors to curtail some business activities which had been allowed under a general easing of the shutdown. North Bay counties on the watch list tighten restrictions, including closing indoor hair salons . The board would be the state enforcement arm to ensure compliance with the order.

The Monday announcement from the state Board of Barbering and Cosmetology (Barber Cosmo) stated the California Department of Public Health and California Department of Industrial Relations (Cal/OSHA) issued “COVID-19 Industry Guidance: Hair Salons and Barbershops Outdoor Services”, which provides guidance for hair salons and barber shops willing to do business outside.

Meanwhile, the director of the Department of Consumer Affairs issued additional guidance on barbering and cosmetology services that “may be safely performed outdoors, the health and safety standards applicable to an establishment’s use of outdoor spaces.”

“The Board applauds the Governor and California Department of Public Health for developing these guidelines for establishments to open safely,” Director Kimberly Kirchmeyer said in a statement. “The Board was able to collaborate on these guidelines, and also developed additional guidelines, The Board hopes that by adhering to both sets of guidelines, establishments will be able to provide a safe environment for their clients and still help with flattening the COVID-19 curve.

Directives by state agencies restate the practices called by government in general — maintaining social distancing and wearing masks

But some were specific to moving operations outside:

  • “Outdoor operations may be conducted under a tent, canopy, or other sun shelter as long as no more than one side is closed, allowing sufficient outdoor air movement.”
  • “Salons and barbershops should not perform a service that would require a customer to have to enter the establishment.”

Other items :

  • Establish an outdoor reception area where customers can check in while still following physical distancing guidelines. Take measures at reception area or other areas where physical distancing cannot be maintained to minimize exposure between workers and customers, such as Plexiglas or other barriers.
  • Consider offering workers who request modified duties options that minimize their contact with customers and other workers (e.g., managing inventory or managing administrative needs through telework).
  • Stagger appointments to reduce reception congestion and ensure adequate time for proper cleaning and sanitation between each customer visit. Consider servicing fewer customers each day or expanding operating hours to allow for more time between customers. Suspend walkin appointment availability.
  • If possible, implement virtual check-in technology to ensure that workers are notified when a customer arrives. Do not allow customers to wait inside the salon or barbershop. Ask customers to wait in a designated area outside that permits necessary physical distancing or in their cars.

The board notification clarified that moving a salon’s operation outdoors remained subject to “other requirements, such as local zoning and permitting rules and local public health orders.”